Skip to content

“We are the planet’s super-predator”

14 January, 2009

As humans hunt, their prey gets smaller: study

clip

“As predators, humans are a dominant evolutionary force,” said Chris Darimont of the University of California, Santa Cruz. “It’s an ideal recipe for rapid trait change.”

Rapid change, of course, is not always good for us as melting glaciers, rising water levels, fiercer storms, significant weather variations have begun to make clear to some of us. And the same is true of living things as well.

clip

[Dairmont and his colleagues] studied changes in the size of fish, limpets, snails, bighorn sheep and caribou, as well as two plants — the Himalayan snow lotus and American ginseng.

In virtually all cases, human-targeted species got smaller and smaller and started reproducing at younger ages — making populations more vulnerable.

clip

Vulnerable food sources and environment will eventually impact our ways of life. Dominant species or not, we are dependent on everything around us for the survival of our species.  (Okay, maybe not rocks.  Maybe we can do without rocks, but you do get my point.)

“The public knows we often harvest far too many fish, but the threat goes above and beyond numbers,” Darimont said in a statement. “We’re changing the very essence of what remains, sometimes within the span of only two decades. We are the planet’s super-predator.”

So, might I suggest that all those hunters who pride themselves in the size of their catch reconsider how it affects us all.  Unless you are hunting for a huge number of people, you can probably make do with the smaller fish, the smaller dear, and the smaller duck.  In the long run we would all benefit from it, including the fish, animals, and other “edibles.”

Unless like me, you are a vegetarian and don’t mind soy, vegetables, fruits, beans, and rice.

read the rest of the story here:

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: